A MAS Update: Rachel Mindrup

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The Midwest Artist Studios Project has spent the past three years traveling the Midwest interviewing 24 artists from 18 cities/towns. This project has been such a joy to create and to see how these artists have touched the lives of art students through online interactions, emails, and social media.

One of the areas we pride ourselves in is staying in touch with these artists and hearing what they are up to these days? For the next two-months the MAS Project will be spotlighting one of our 24 artists by sharing with you what they are doing in their studio as well as in their communities. 

All three of our MAS publications are now available online.

Click here to buy your copy today!

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RACHEL MINDRUP

2016 MAS artist from Nebraska

 

MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

RM: One really beneficial aspect of this program has been watching the other MAS artist’s interviews. It is invigorating to watch other artist’s work and share their thoughts about art and art education. It has also been a great vehicle to start dialogues about what it means to be an artist in our region. With these MAS videos, I have been able to expose my own college students here in Omaha to the work of those living right here in our area. It has also awakened the idea of collaboration to me. I have a tendency to spend long periods of time isolated, creating work, and this has been a great, albeit virtual, way to connect with other artists.

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MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

RM: My working environment has changed just in the amount of work I am doing. I have three major stations in my studio now where I have 2 paintings and 1 drawing going simultaneously. I am beginning a few new portrait themes and figurative works that I am doing concurrently with my Many Faces of NF project.

MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

RM: I wish I would have mentioned that as a teenager I erroneously believed that all artists lived and worked on the coasts.  Because I didn’t know any working artists here in town, it never occurred to me that I could actually stay in Nebraska and live, work and create and be just as valid in my art career as someone living in Los Angeles or New York City. What a treat for these teenagers to realize this early in their lives (if they are also under the same false assumptions). There no longer is this need to try to decide between being an artist and living near your family!

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Rachel has an upcoming solo show at the Kansas City Artist Coalition’s Under Ground Gallery with two other artists who are also having solo shows.

http://kansascityartistscoalition.org/exhibitionsUpcomming.php

Visit Rachel’s website to see more of her work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

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A MAS Update: Catie Miller, Joe Bussell, Josh Wilichowski, Emmy Lingscheit, and Paula Schulze

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The Midwest Artist Studios Project has spent the past three years traveling the Midwest interviewing 24 artists from 18 cities/towns. This project has been such a joy to create and to see how these artists have touched the lives of art students through online interactions, emails, and social media.

One of the areas we pride ourselves in is staying in touch with these artists and hearing what they are up to these days? For the next two-months the MAS Project will be spotlighting one of our 24 artists by sharing with you what they are doing in their studio as well as in their communities. 

All three of our MAS publications are now available online.

Click here to buy your copy today!

_________________________________________________________________

Catie Miller

2014 MAS artist from Missouri

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MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

CM: I was published in the MAS workbook and gained exposure from the project. 

MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

CM: When I was interviewed, I was doing an artist residency in Kansas City. Since then, my residency has ended. I now live in Fargo, ND. I work full time as a studio artist from my home studio. My process has shifted slightly from the original interview. I use newsprint transfers on the surface of my ceramic work. In connecting surface and form, I balance densely filled graphic areas with simple raw clay surfaces. Similar to a monoprint process, I transfer drawings from newsprint to clay with underglaze and colored slips. This method results in diverse representation of my drawings, creating a timely, aged, and weathered appearance on the red clay foundation.

MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

I hope my work is used as a platform for meals and conversation around the dinner table.  

Visit Catie’s website to see more of her work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

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Joe Bussell

2016 MAS artist from Kansas

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MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

JB: Your visit proved that a studio visit can be a comfortable relaxing situation. Some art professionals and even some art lovers visit with this, I have something to prove attitude. You and Jonathan put me at ease instantly. Wish you could bottle that.

MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

After your visit I decided to sell my studio and am currently planning to build a new space.

MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

JB: I wish I had conveyed the importance of talking about art and process in general and what art means in our day to day.

Fred Trease and Joe Bussell have a 2 person show at MAC College in Moberly, MO coming up in April 2017. The exhibition was curated by Andrew Glenn.

Visit Joe’s website to see more of his work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

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Josh Wilichowski

2014 MAS artist from Minnesotameasured-controlled-response-8x11-2014 

MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

JW: For me, MAS was a great way to practice thinking and talking about my work, theory and process.  I inherently gravitate toward the physical part of making art, and being able to host the MAS crew was a fantastic opportunity to organize and fine-tune my thoughts. 

MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

We moved from North St Paul, MN to Stillwater, MN in May of 2015. My previous space was made up of two disjointed spaces, but afforded me space to work both two and three dimensionally.  In my current situation, I have a small drawing studio on the first floor of our home, but do not have a viable space for larger, more labor intensive work.  I hope to resolve this in the near future by building a space that can house both a clean and dirty work areas. 

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MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

I’d hope they remember that my work is has a high level of craft, but is earnest and quiet. 

Josh concluded being part of the Minnesota Regional Exhibition at Manifest Gallery in Cincinnati, and he will be showing the lion share of my work in a 3 person show at ArtReach St Croix, which opens February 19, 2017. 

 

Visit Josh’s website to see more of his work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

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Emmy Lingscheit

2015 MAS artist from Illinois

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MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

EL: Participation in the Midwest Artist Studios project has brought exposure to my work, and camaraderie with the other MAS artists whom I’ve met via the project. It’s great to have my work and processes made available for K-12 students, to potentially enrich their art education.

MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

EL: I continue to work primarily as a printmaker, though I still also exhibit the ceramic work made during my first interview with MAS while I was at the Kohler Arts/Industry Residency. I hope to have the opportunity to work in cast ceramic again at some point.

MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

EL: My work investigates the relationships between the biological and the man-made, revealing a post-natural world in which the line between synthetic and organic beings, systems, and materials is increasingly blurry. 

Visit Emmy’s website to see more of her work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

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Paula Schulze

2014 MAS artist from Wisconsin

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MAS: In what ways have you benefited from your participation in MAS?

PS: I hope that students and teachers have enjoyed the activities designed around my work and studio practice. I look forward to the MAS exhibition and the opportunity to meet the other artists and those who have used the project in their classroom.

MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

PS: My studio and practice are much the same as when I was interviewed for the MAS project, and I continue to focus on prints and drawings. In addition, I have enjoyed taking workshops and experimenting with processes such as Takbon printing, artist books, and photograms. 

Visit Paula’s website to see more of her work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

A MAS Update: Karri Dieken

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The Midwest Artist Studios Project has spent the past three years traveling the Midwest interviewing 24 artists from 18 cities/towns. This project has been such a joy to create and to see how these artists have touched the lives of art students through online interactions, emails, and social media.

One of the areas we pride ourselves in is staying in touch with these artists and hearing what they are up to these days? For the next two-months the MAS Project will be spotlighting one of our 24 artists by sharing with you what they are doing in their studio as well as in their communities. 

All three of our MAS publications are now available online.

Click here to buy your copy today!

_________________________________________________________________

Karri Dieken

2016 MAS artist from North Dakota

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MAS: In what ways have you benefitted from your participation in MAS?

KD: Built a larger art community, sharing art and artist from the project with students at VCSU. The projected has had a way of keeping me connected to the practice of making. Current roles in art education, tend to take away from studio time, the MAS project has inspired daily mini projects, to larger more intricate pieces. 

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MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

KD: In the past year much of the work was focused on the absence of colour, using only white on white in its variations. The new series of work focuses more on photorealism, representation through photographic truths, and emphasis on colour as memory. 

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MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

KD: There is plenty to be said when it comes to advocating for the arts, I could go on for days about the small steps to larger steps to take to raise awareness and creating a community for the arts. However, its limited to action from these words. I hope that people take away a sense of opportunity from the work, see the mistakes and embrace them, and become motivated to find their creative voice in the act of making. 

Photos courtesy of Brenna Winter, VCSU Art Major

Looking Ahead

Karri will be participating in the following:

February 5-12: North Dakota Museum of Art “This Week Only” digital cross stitch print “Kadoka” Grand Forks ND

March 4: Plains Art Museum, 2017 Scholastic Art and Writing Exhibition and Educator Pin Award, for student Megan Tichy scholastic achievement. Fargo, ND.

March 10:  MAS exhibition, reception: 5-9pm at Walker’s Point Center for the Arts. 

May 20: Barnes County Museum Artist Lecture Series “The Last Bite” Valley Cit, ND

Visit Karri’s website to see more of her work.

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

 

A MAS Update: Larry Thomas

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The Midwest Artist Studios Project has spent the past three years traveling the Midwest interviewing 24 artists from 18 cities/towns. This project has been such a joy to create and to see how these artists have touched the lives of art students through online interactions, emails, and social media.

One of the areas we pride ourselves in is staying in touch with these artists and hearing what they are up to these days? For the next two-months the MAS Project will be spotlighting one of our 24 artists by sharing with you what they are doing in their studio as well as in their communities. 

All three of our MAS publications are now available online.

Click here to buy your copy today!

_________________________________________________________________

Larry Thomas

2016 MAS artist from Kansas

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MAS: In what ways have you benefitted from your participation in MAS?

LT: I think probably the most important element for me, is that I’ve gotten to connect with students again, at least to some degree.  Since I retired I’ve missed sharing my experiences with students.  I can only hope the students, and possibly some teachers, got some exposure as to how I proceed through my work. A lot of what I do with collages is similar to what other artists do, but maybe there is one little tip or approach they weren’t familiar with.

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MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

LT: Since I’ve been a practicing artist for over 40 years, my studio environment has evolved over that time pretty slowly.  There are some things that are just a part of the routine and ritual that I have developed over a long period of time.  That being said, after I did the lesson plan I feel like I’ve improved and become more efficient in creating my work.  The process of having to organize, research, self-analyze and present my art-making method in a text/photo format was a very good exercise for me.  As Socrates said,  “A life unexamined is not worth living.”  I like to think I’m constantly examining and re-examining myself and everything around me.

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MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

LT: I always hope that my work is compelling and mysterious in some way, and that its not illustrative or trite.

Looking ahead:

image001Opening June 2017, Larry will have a solo exhibition, So You Think You Know. It will be an immersive installation comprised of hundreds of small collages. He has explored the concepts of perception, deception, invisibility and camouflage, both visually and metaphorically, for over 20 years.  For the Nerman Museum’s Kansas Focus Gallery, he has constructed intimate collages employing traditional means like painting, drawing, and printmaking combined with the more contemporary medium of digitally generated images – each work a response to the barrage of information which engulfs us daily. 

photo credit: Larry Thomas at work in his Olathe, KS studio, courtesy the artist

Visit Larry’s website to see more of his work. 

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

 

A MAS Update: Jason Ackman

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The Midwest Artist Studios Project has spent the past three years traveling the Midwest interviewing 24 artists from 18 cities/towns. This project has been such a joy to create and to see how these artists have touched the lives of art students through online interactions, emails, and social media.

One of the areas we pride ourselves in is staying in touch with these artists and hearing what they are up to these days? For the next two-months the MAS Project will be spotlighting one of our 24 artists by sharing with you what they are doing in their studio as well as in their communities. 

All three of our MAS publications are now available online.

Click here to buy your copy today!

_________________________________________________________________

Jason Ackman

2015 MAS artist from Illinois

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MAS: In what ways have you benefitted from your participation in MAS?

JA: I have personally benefited from my involvement with MAS in a variety of ways.  The project has introduced and connected me with a bunch of artists in my region of the US.  Artists that I would most likely not known about had I not been involved with the work of MAS (Thank you!).  

It has given me more opportunities to not only talk and share info about the work I do but the work of other outstanding and fascinating artists in the Midwest.  This is a welcomed change since often times it seems that “real artists” are located in the major cities in the US, specifically out west and east.  

I also believe it has given me a boost of confidence and encouragement knowing that a project like MAS is interested in telling some of my story as an artist.  Not only as an artist, but an artist from the part of our nation that is often times overlooked when it comes artists making meaningful, significant work. 

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MAS: In what ways has your work and/or working environment changed since your MAS interview?

JA: My studio work has drastically changed over the past year.  Shortly after the MAS team visited my studio I held my first solo exhibit.  Once that exhibit closed my studio practice took a major shift.  My practice has now become more about the social and community interaction with the arts.  I have spent very little time making work or objects that would be seen in an exhibit.  Instead, I have been focusing my energies on developing a local arts and cultural center as well as renovating a historic brick mansion (in a rural town of 150 people) into a future artist residency program. Although I have not been making work in the traditional sense, this new “work” has evolved into a practice of sorts.  The communal aspect of creating has become more of a focus for me. 

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MAS: What is one thing you wish you’d said in your original interview, or what is the one thing that you hope the MAS audience remembers about your and your work?

JA: There are so many things I would have liked to have said 🙂  I don’t even know where to begin. 

Visit Jason’s website to see more of his work. 

All images copyright of the artist and used with permission.

MAS artist, Emmy Lingscheit at the John Michael Kohler Arts Center

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Through her work, Emmy Lingscheit investigates the interdependencies and exchanges between the biological and the man-made, revealing a postnatural world in which the line between synthetic and organic beings, systems, and materials is increasingly blurry. Her work is informed by dystopian fiction, climate disruption, irony, hope, and the current alarming pace of species extinction planet-wide. As a visual artist working primarily in the medium of printmaking, she participates in a long tradition of dialogue between art, science, and cultural rhetoric, via the multiple. 

Emmy is currently an assistant professor and coordinator of printmaking at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. She holds a BFA in painting from St. Cloud State University in Minnesota, and an MFA in printmaking from the University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Emmy has held residencies at the Highpoint Center for Printmaking in Minneapolis, MN, at Zygote Press in Cleveland, OH, at Ucross in Sheridan, WY, and recently at the Kohler plant in Kohler, WI. Her work has been exhibited nationally and internationally, including recently at Davidson Galleries in Seattle, WA, Nash Gallery in Minneapolis, MN, and The International Print Center in New York, NY.

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Midwest Artist Studios Project at the Wisconsin Art Education Association 2016 Conference

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Frank being interviewed for Artspeak Radio

Frank being interviewed for Artspeak Radio in Kansas City, KS. Photo by Fred Trease.

I am happy to announce that my Midwest Artist Studios Project proposal has been accepted to be part of the 2016 WAEA Fall Conference: Bold and Bright, in La Crosse, Wisconsin in October 2016. Also, the MAS Project is a proud sponsor of this state art education conference and will be onsite as an exhibitor. Our MAS Publication will be available for purchase. 

Get your copy today!

The mission of the Wisconsin Art Education Association is to promote excellence in visual art and design education for all students by:
•     providing professional growth opportunities for visual art and design teachers.
•     showcasing student talents and abilities supporting art and design as academic core disciplines.
•     communicating with other art and design organizations.
•     offering lifelong learning opportunities acting on vital art and design education issues. 
WAEA COver Brochure 2016
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